Occupy Our Homes gains foreclosure negotiation with Freddie Mac

A tall, gray-haired African-American man bangs on the plexiglass doors of 325 7th Street. When officers approach him, I wait for an angry confrontation, an arrest. But following some chilly stares, there are only friendly handshakes.

The tall man was Rev. Graylan Hagler, a participant in a protest in front of the DC offices of Freddie Mac. Occupy Our Homes, which focuses on the foreclosures resulting from the 2008 mortgage-securities malfeasance, organized the protest. In conjunction with Occupy DC, Occupy Our Homes is fighting to save the home of Bertina Jones, a resident of Bowie, MD, from foreclosure.

Locked out of a banking institution’s marbled lobby. It seems appropriate. While Occupy Our Homes protestors circle the sidewalk, I ask Rev. Hagler why he was knocking on the door and what brought him here. He begins to answer, then suddenly darts off without explanation.

He follows a trench-coated man up 7th Street, who stops in a doorway to check his smartphone, then returns to the Freddie Mac office building. A few minutes later, the protest moves around to the side of the building to the entrance of the parking garage. Rev. Hagler explains that the police engaged in a little diversion to allow building occupants to enter and exit while the front doors were locked.

Bertina Jones

At the parking garage entrance, Bertina Jones speaks to the crowd, admitting to nerves in front of so many people. I admire her moxie. It can’t be easy to take your troubles out in the open and step into the limelight for a cause. The Fox News line is that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac caused the mortgage crisis with affordable housing policies–in other words, high-risk loans to minorities. In contrast, Occupy Our Homes points to Jones as someone who “did everything right.” In spite of falling behind in payments because of losing her job, she tried to work with Bank of America, the original mortgage-holder, and didn’t try to shirk her obligation.

“I cried a lot,” she said. She told Occupy DC, “Thank you for coming to fight for my house, but I’m just one of hundreds” of homeowners being foreclosed on, and added, “I’m so glad I stood up and fought, and I hope more homeowners will join us.”

At first denied entry, Jones was allowed in to deliver a letter to Freddie Mac, although officials wouldn’t meet with her today. On Tuesday, Occupy Our Homes plans to protest in front of Freddie Mac’s headquarters in Tyson’s Corner. They can claim a victory, however–what was a guaranteed foreclosure is at least now at the negotiating table. Following the protest, Freddie Mac says they have contacted Bertina Jones and are “working with her and Bank of America toward a positive resolution.”

Rev. Graylan Hagler

Meanwhile, counter-protestors on Freedom Plaza calling themselves Occupy Occupy DC objected to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for different reasons today–the taxpayer bailout of the GSE mortgage-holders. David Almasi, executive director of the National Center for Public Policy Research said, “Through the quasi-governmental Fannie and Freddie, the federal government now has a virtual monopoly on home loans. As a result, those who made prudent lending decisions must now take on additional debt that they would have never sought on their own. That is not fair.”

UPDATE: OccupyOurHomes has won a victory for Bertina Jones! Freddie Mac says it will rescind her foreclosure and allow her to stay in her home.

(Images by coolrevolution.net)

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3 thoughts on “Occupy Our Homes gains foreclosure negotiation with Freddie Mac

  1. Pingback: Occupy Our Homes, low-income tenants object to development plan in Alexandria « Cool Revolution

  2. Pingback: Occupy Our Homes DC: The right to housing « Cool Revolution

  3. Pingback: U.S. Marshals breach Occupy Our Homes blockade, evict DC tenant « Cool Revolution

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